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Collected Letters Volume Two: Books, Broadcasts and War, 1931–1949

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Язык: Английский
Год издания: 2019 год
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      Collected Letters Volume Two: Books, Broadcasts and War, 1931–1949
Walter Hooper

C. S. Lewis

This three-volume collection brings together the best of C.S. Lewis’s letters – some published for the first time. This second volume covers the years from 1931–1949, charting Lewis’ emergence as a great Christian thinker and apologist.C.S. Lewis was a most prolific letter writer and his personal correspondence reveals much of his private life, reflections, friendships and feelings. This collection, carefully chosen and arranged by Walter Hooper, is the most extensive ever published.In this great and important collection are the letters Lewis wrote to J.R.R. Tolkien, Dorothy L. Sayers, Owen Barfield, Arthur C. Clarke, Sheldon Vanauken and Dom Bede Griffiths. To some particular friends, such as Dorothy L. Sayers, Lewis wrote over fifty letters alone. The letters deal with all of Lewis’s interests: theology, literary criticism, poetry, fantasy, children’s stories as well as revealing his relationships with family members and friends.The second volume begins with Lewis quietly trying to lead a Christian life and writing his first major work of literary history, The Allegory of Love. He was unknown during the 1930s and at this time wrote some of his finest letters, mainly to his brother Warren and to his boyhood friend Arthur Greeves. Then he is ‘discovered’ by the BBC and the publishers Geoffrey Bles, resulting in the most popular works of Christian apologetics ever written. C.S. Lewis became a household name and from the 1940s onwards some of his greatest theological letters were written.

THE COLLECTED LETTERS OF C. S. LEWIS

———VOLUME II——— Books, Broadcasts, and the War, 1931–1949 EDITED BY WALTER HOOPER

Copyright (#u9c47d65c-00f5-53d1-b288-9095cdf4355d)

William Collins

An imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers Ltd. 1 London Bridge Street London SE1 9GF

www.harpercollins.co.uk (http://www.harpercollins.co.uk/)

THE COLLECTED LETTERS OF C. S. LEWIS, VOLUME II: Books, Broadcasts, and the War, 1931–1949. Copyright © 2004 by C. S. Lewis Pte Ltd.

The right of C. S. Lewis to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. By payment of the required fees, you have been granted the non-exclusive, non-transferable right to access and read the text of this ebook on-screen. No part of this text may be reproduced, transmitted, downloaded, decompiled, reverse engineered, or stored in or introduced into any information storage and retrieval system, in any form or by any means whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of HarperCollins ebooks

HarperCollinsPublishers has made every reasonable effort to ensure that any picture content and written content in this ebook has been included or removed in accordance with the contractual and technological constraints in operation at the time of publication

Source ISBN: 9780006281467

Ebook Edition © JUNE 2009 ISBN: 9780007332663

Version: 2017-03-24

CONTENTS

Cover (#u633c4518-f86a-5518-8870-a8e26bd21d26)

Title Page (#u6b3abd7b-281d-5a79-89cc-c5672a0fda0e)

Copyright (#u0d801729-09a1-5d00-bcb0-1ae65191f148)

Preface

Abbreviations

Letters:

Chapter 1 - 1931 (#ulink_e58d7830-0253-5865-949d-76d8641b0102)

Chapter 2 - 1932 (#ulink_36d0b3f5-e3fb-520f-9883-1b9c5fae58f9)

Chapter 3 - 1933 (#ulink_18e5cc4e-5f9f-50e0-b39a-cba20dd1804b)

Chapter 4 - 1934 (#ulink_6dfcfe59-afb9-5a85-af7e-21463d415455)

Chapter 5 - 1935 (#ulink_550fcee8-3d5f-557f-a4bd-a79b8795a188)

Chapter 6 - 1936 (#ulink_073ce712-bce2-5c14-aae9-b2f59f95226e)

Chapter 7 - 1937 (#ulink_0949c460-1e52-5fad-a298-0d34dba07d0e)

Chapter 8 - 1938 (#ulink_edda5074-ec56-5f47-8c9f-5e85792cd211)

Chapter 9 - 1939 (#ulink_84c8ae51-3135-50f8-bbe6-438d9c924e9b)

Chapter 10 - 1940 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 11 - 1941 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 12 - 1942 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 13 - 1943 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 14 - 1944 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 15 - 1945 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 16 - 1946 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 17 - 1947 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 18 - 1948 (#litres_trial_promo)

Chapter 19 - 1949 (#litres_trial_promo)

Keep Reading (#litres_trial_promo)

Biographical Appendix (#litres_trial_promo)

Index (#litres_trial_promo)

Books By C. S. Lewis (#litres_trial_promo)

About the Publisher (#litres_trial_promo)

PREFACE (#u9c47d65c-00f5-53d1-b288-9095cdf4355d)

‘I have just passed on from believing in God to definitely believing in Christ—in Christianity.’

(#ulink_8bce8f7a-ce18-5fc3-acab-a1b42b6f5840) C. S. Lewis had been an atheist for twenty years, and this was news his boyhood friend Arthur Greeves longed to hear. Arthur pressed him for details, and in the letter of 18 October 1931 with which Volume I of the Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis closed, Lewis described his momentous evening on 19 September when J. R. R. Tolkien and Hugo Dyson dined with him at Magdalen. They strolled through Addison’s Walk and then sat in Lewis’s rooms until 4 a.m. talking about Christianity and its relation to myth. ‘The story of Christ,’ Lewis concluded, ‘is simply a true myth: a myth working on us in the same way as the others, but with this tremendous difference that it really happened.’

(#ulink_45cddbe4-febe-581d-92a2-4d22d2f5332b)

This second volume of letters begins at that point, and the reader soon discovers what a ‘tremendous difference’ conversion to Christianity made in Lewis. In the Family Letters Lewis was struggling to find his voice as a poet; in the letters included in this volume he had, it seems, found many voices. He writes on such a wide range of subjects that some readers will wonder if, perhaps, there was more than one C. S. Lewis.

Owen Barfield,

(#ulink_bbff71b0-c541-547f-964c-77c518eb8409) the intimate friend whose letters from Lewis run through all three volumes, suggested that there was indeed more than one Lewis. In a piece entitled ‘The Five C. S. Lewises’ Barfield wrote:

A fairly unsophisticated person who had never had any personal contract with Lewis, but who…had read the whole or most of what has been written about him, might be pardoned for wondering if it were not one writer, but three, with whom he wasbecoming acquainted: three men who just happened to have the same name and the same peculiar vigor of thought and utterance. Such a reader (I will venture to put myself in his shoes) might, to avoid confusion, adopt the nomenclature L1, L2, and L3, L1 being a distinguished and original literary critic, L2 a highly successful author of fiction, and L3 the writer and broadcaster of popular Christian apologetics.

(#ulink_c7df613d-958c-5382-ad00-6cd368bee2e7)

Barfield went on to point out that one of the first things the ‘unsophisticated person’ would notice is that, while admirers of Lewis the Original Literary Critic usually have little interest in the Lewis the Christian Apologist, readers of both Lewis the Original Literary Critic and Lewis the Christian Apologist are interested in Lewis the Writer of Fiction. Another thing such a person would notice, said Barfield, is that Lewis the Original Literary Critic has received much less attention than the other two Lewises, and that it would hardly be too much to say that the Literary Critic has been ‘swamped’ by the Apologist and the Writer of Fiction.

The other two Lewises mentioned by Owen Barfield are ‘the one before and the other after his conversion’.

(#ulink_9f6b8834-3cef-56a2-afcc-3f6a64cd0f8c) Given that Lewis was now a Christian, how were these four remaining Lewises related? Again I turn to Owen Barfield who knew them longer and probably thought more about them than anyone:
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